An exploration of how identity capital is constructed in the narrative life stories of fathers in areas of disadvantage.

Pitman, Jessica (2021) An exploration of how identity capital is constructed in the narrative life stories of fathers in areas of disadvantage. Doctoral thesis, University of Wales Trinity Saint David.

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Abstract

There is limited research concerning fathers who live in areas of disadvantage and their life experiences. Deficit model thinking and pathologisation of people who live in areas of disadvantage can be found in research and policy, and none more so than for fathers who may not fit desired ideals of fatherhood which are prevalent in society. This study explores how identity capital is constructed in the narrative life stories of three fathers who live in areas of disadvantage in South Wales, UK. In this context, identity capital is defined as the resources that are constructed by relationships with people and society. The literature focusses on fatherhood and masculinity and how grand narrative views mediate specific generalisations of fatherhood in research and policy. The term Hegemonic Fatherhood, is used to stipulate fathering practices that many men may not achieve. Using a narrative inquiry methodology, the thesis enables a focus on fathers’ life experiences as a way of highlighting identity capital in their life stories and how this is constructed Because Of or In Spite Of their relationships with others or the wider social context. A purposeful sample of three fathers from established Dad’s groups provided the participants for the study. They were interviewed using Biographical Narrative Interview Method (BNIvM), which allows an interview to be directed by the participant without pre-defined topics and themes. Analysis and re-presentation of the narratives highlighted ways in which fathers’ identity capital was hindered, including loss of contact with children from first relationships, community violence exposure and female-male intimate partner violence. Fathers were able to construct identity capital resources through the use of Inverse Protest Masculinity, a new term which celebrates the ability of fathers in this study to push against the structural forces of society andThere is limited research concerning fathers who live in areas of disadvantage and their life experiences. Deficit model thinking and pathologisation of people who live in areas of disadvantage can be found in research and policy, and none more so than for fathers who may not fit desired ideals of fatherhood which are prevalent in society. This study explores how identity capital is constructed in the narrative life stories of three fathers who live in areas of disadvantage in South Wales, UK. In this context, identity capital is defined as the resources that are constructed by relationships with people and society. The literature focusses on fatherhood and masculinity and how grand narrative views mediate specific generalisations of fatherhood in research and policy. The term Hegemonic Fatherhood, is used to stipulate fathering practices that many men may not achieve. Using a narrative inquiry methodology, the thesis enables a focus on fathers’ life experiences as a way of highlighting identity capital in their life stories and how this is constructed Because Of or In Spite Of their relationships with others or the wider social context. A purposeful sample of three fathers from established Dad’s groups provided the participants for the study. They were interviewed using Biographical Narrative Interview Method (BNIvM), which allows an interview to be directed by the participant without pre-defined topics and themes. Analysis and re-presentation of the narratives highlighted ways in which fathers’ identity capital was hindered, including loss of contact with children from first relationships, community violence exposure and female-male intimate partner violence. Fathers were able to construct identity capital resources through the use of Inverse Protest Masculinity, a new term which celebrates the ability of fathers in this study to push against the structural forces of society andThere is limited research concerning fathers who live in areas of disadvantage and their life experiences. Deficit model thinking and pathologisation of people who live in areas of disadvantage can be found in research and policy, and none more so than for fathers who may not fit desired ideals of fatherhood which are prevalent in society. This study explores how identity capital is constructed in the narrative life stories of three fathers who live in areas of disadvantage in South Wales, UK. In this context, identity capital is defined as the resources that are constructed by relationships with people and society. The literature focusses on fatherhood and masculinity and how grand narrative views mediate specific generalisations of fatherhood in research and policy. The term Hegemonic Fatherhood, is used to stipulate fathering practices that many men may not achieve. Using a narrative inquiry methodology, the thesis enables a focus on fathers’ life experiences as a way of highlighting identity capital in their life stories and how this is constructed Because Of or In Spite Of their relationships with others or the wider social context. A purposeful sample of three fathers from established Dad’s groups provided the participants for the study. They were interviewed using Biographical Narrative Interview Method (BNIvM), which allows an interview to be directed by the participant without pre-defined topics and themes. Analysis and re-presentation of the narratives highlighted ways in which fathers’ identity capital was hindered, including loss of contact with children from first relationships, community violence exposure and female-male intimate partner violence. Fathers were able to construct identity capital resources through the use of Inverse Protest Masculinity, a new term which celebrates the ability of fathers in this study to push against the structural forces of society and prejudgements of men living in areas of disadvantage.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Uncontrolled Keywords: fathers identity capital disadvantaged areas
Divisions: Theses and Dissertations > Doctoral Theses
Depositing User: Sandra Stedman
Date Deposited: 20 May 2021 11:33
Last Modified: 25 May 2021 12:59
URI: https://repository.uwtsd.ac.uk/id/eprint/1657

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