Anadem An Exploration of Queer Representation and Dress in Young Adult (YA) Dystopia

Appleton, Briony (2019) Anadem An Exploration of Queer Representation and Dress in Young Adult (YA) Dystopia. Masters thesis, University of Wales Trinity Saint David.

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Abstract

YA fiction has grown in popularity and renown in recent years, becoming a stylised mode of writing in its own right. Divided into a creative and critical focus element, this thesis explores Young Adult (YA) Dystopia’s problematic preference for portraying its ruling classes as queer coded and over-indulgent. Within the creative element I explore how and why a fictional dystopian world order might result in its ruling class adopting a queer sub-community’s modes of existence. As such the creative element of Anadem: An Exploration of Queer Representation and Dress in Young Adult (YA) Dystopia is at its core, a subversive criticism of the sub-genre as a whole. Using The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (New York City: Scholastic, 2008) and Legend by Marie Lu (London: Penguin Random House, 2012) as key source materials, the creative element of Anadem: An Exploration of Queer Representation and Dress in Young Adult (YA) Dystopia uses dress to establish its characters as vehicles for political and personal contention. In the concluding critical element, I evaluate the difficulties and challenges I encountered during the writing process, the way I approached my personal goals for the thesis and consider the methods I applied when describing the clothing and appearance of Anadem’s characters. The concluding critical element acts as a means of self-reflection and examination; allowing for a brief analysis of my creative decisions and reasoning, including a brief introduction to the genre and my personal interest in highlighting YA’s transformative potential as a genre that prioritises coming-of-age, self-discovery narratives.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General)
Z Bibliography. Library Science. Information Resources > Z004 Books. Writing. Paleography
Divisions: Theses and Dissertations
Depositing User: Natalie Williams
Date Deposited: 27 Aug 2021 14:33
Last Modified: 27 Aug 2021 14:33
URI: https://repository.uwtsd.ac.uk/id/eprint/1768

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