Characterising the health and social care segment of the BCS (The Chartered Institute for IT) membership and their continuing professional development needs

MacLure, Katie and MacLure, Andrew and Levy, Sharon and Dearing, Wendy (2022) Characterising the health and social care segment of the BCS (The Chartered Institute for IT) membership and their continuing professional development needs. BMJ Health & Care Informatics, 29 (1). e100504. ISSN 2632-1009

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Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the health and social care membership of the British Computer Society (BCS), an international informatics professional organisation, and to determine their ongoing development needs. Methods: A prepiloted online survey included items on professional regulatory body, job role, work sector, qualifications, career stage, BCS membership (type, specialist group/branch activity (committees, event attendance)), use of BCS.org career planning/continuing professional development (CPD) tools, self-reported digital literacy and other professional registrations. The quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics in JASP V.0.9.2 to report frequencies and correlations. Results: Responses were received from 152 participants. Most were male (n=103; 68%), aged 50–59 years (n=41; 28%), working in England (n=107; 71%) with master’s or honours degrees (n=80; 53%). Most were either new (5 years or less; n=61; 40%) or long-term members (21 years or more; n=43; 28%) of BCS. Most were not interested in health specialist groups (n=57; 38%) preferring non-health specialist groups such as information management (n=54; 37%) and project management (n=52; 34%). Discussion: This is the first paper to characterise the health and social care membership of an IT-focused professional body and to start to determine their CPD needs. There are further challenges ahead in curating the content and delivery. Conclusion: This study is the starting point from which members’ CPD needs, and ongoing interest, in being recognised as health and social care professional members, can be acknowledged and explored. Further research is planned with the participants who volunteered to be part of designing future CPD content and delivery.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: ** Embargo end date: 13-03-2022 ** From BMJ via Jisc Publications Router ** History: received 26-10-2021; accepted 20-01-2022; ppub 03-2022; epub 13-03-2022. ** Licence for this article starting on 13-03-2022: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Uncontrolled Keywords: Original research, 1506, BCS health, BMJ health informatics, health care sector, informatics
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA75 Electronic computers. Computer science
R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
SWORD Depositor: JISC Publications Router
Depositing User: JISC Publications Router
Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2022 11:45
Last Modified: 25 Mar 2022 13:20
URI: https://repository.uwtsd.ac.uk/id/eprint/1930

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