Themes, Lexemes, and "Mnemes": Composite Allusions in the Gospel of John and other Jewish Literature

Voo, Samuel L. (2023) Themes, Lexemes, and "Mnemes": Composite Allusions in the Gospel of John and other Jewish Literature. Doctoral thesis, University of Wales Trinity Saint David.

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Abstract

This thesis examines composite allusions to the Jewish scriptures in the Gospel of John and compares these to similar phenomena in late Second Temple Jewish literature. Composite allusions are defined in this study as allusions clustered together in a single literary unit that are best interpreted together. To analyze such allusions, I develop a three-fold method integrating 1) literary analysis; 2) Jewish catchword exegesis; and 3) insights from studies in ancient media culture. The passages I examine are, first, six passages from Jewish literature (CD 1:1–3; 1QHa 16:5–12a; Sir. 33:7–15; Exod. 15:3 LXX; Ps. 71:17 LXX; and Isa. 3:9 LXX); secondly, a double citation in John (12:37–40); and, finally, three composite allusions in John (1:29, 7:37–39, 15:1–11). I argue that the composite features across all of these passages function on the basis of common lexemes, common themes, and metonymy. For all the cases in question I offer fresh insights on how different ancient texts and traditions were likely to have become associated with each other, and how, in the Gospel of John, these associations are embedded in the narrative and utilized for the author’s theological and literary purposes. In my synthesizing conclusion, I apply the results of my findings to the current debate about the “Jewishness” of John. On the one hand, the Gospel of John demonstrates a sophisticated interaction with its scriptural sources—and thus situates itself squarely within the Jewish exegetical traditions of its day. On the other hand, scriptural allusions are employed above all in the interests of christology—setting it outside of and beyond the compass of other Jewish writings.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Uncontrolled Keywords: use of the Jewish scriptures, Gospel of John, allusions, metonymic reference, ancient media culture, orality, oral-derived, catchword exegesis, social memory, composite citation, composite allusion, Second Temple, Qumran, Sirach, Septuagint (LXX), living waters, spirit, lamb of God, sin of the world, atonement, suffering servant, Isaiah 53, New Exodus, Passover, abide, vine, branch, christology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BS The Bible
Divisions: Theses and Dissertations > Doctoral Theses
Depositing User: Samuel Voo
Date Deposited: 07 Nov 2023 10:28
Last Modified: 07 Nov 2023 10:28
URI: https://repository.uwtsd.ac.uk/id/eprint/2667

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