Translating, Rewriting and Omitting: Subversive Welsh Translators in Great Britain in the 1790

Loffler, Marion (2018) Translating, Rewriting and Omitting: Subversive Welsh Translators in Great Britain in the 1790. In: Translation, hegemony and domination in a globalized world. Multilingual Matters. (In Press)

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Abstract

This essay focuses on the uses of translation from imperial English into colonised Welsh during the Franco-British war of 1793–1802. It explores the complex relationship between political domination and the translator’s position as interpreter of power, but also as part of a Welsh tradition based on the Bible translation of writing fluent TTs which enriched their native TL and culture (Bassnett 2014: 56–60). One of the main goals is to draw attention to the translation experience into colonised languages within Europe before the twentieth century, which, apart from the work of Michael Cronin (Cronin 1996: 3; Cronin 2004), remains neglected in translation research.1 I will argue that, in the case of translation into such colonised languages, a domesticating strategy which results in fluent translations does not necessarily amount to the ‘ethnocentric violence’ which, according to Venuti, characterises such translation from colonised into colonial languages (2008: 16), and has lead him to favour a foreignising strategy (Venuti 1995: 273–306). Related to this, I will demonstrate that, during the 1790s, it was the attempted foreignisation of a Welsh TT in the direction of the colonial SL English by a translator, which was rejected by Welsh TL guardians as a threat to the continuity of the Welsh textual tradition. Last but not least, this article will contend that an ‘invisibility’ of the translator in the TT, rather than denigrating the translator as is often asserted, can save him/her from political persecution by the dominant group.

Item Type: Book Section
Uncontrolled Keywords: French Revolution 1789;Translation studies;Welsh studies Welsh history; 18th century; William Owen Pughe; Thomas Evans (Tomos Glyn Cothi); Britain at war; Lesser-used languages; minority languages
Subjects: D History General and Old World > DC France
P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General) > PN0441 Literary History
Divisions: Centre for Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies
Depositing User: Sandra Stedman
Date Deposited: 22 Jun 2016 13:00
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2018 01:02
URI: http://repository.uwtsd.ac.uk/id/eprint/611

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